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I drew a thing today.
…
Definitely need more practise.

I drew a thing today.

Definitely need more practise.

(Source: furaffinity.net)

Video

It gave me chills.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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lazaruswerks:

Endeavour

lazaruswerks:

Endeavour

Tags: space science
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lazaruswerks:

mindofsams:

jellybeanjeunet:

sleezysays:


NASA recently released imagery showing the deforestation of America  …in just 34 years.

We are killing the Earth

Forever reblog.

And people wonder why the Earth is trying to kill us off with the special shampoo

Except the “1978” image is actually data from the TERRA satellite in 1999 taken during June-August, when vegetation is naturally more prevalent. 
The 2012 image is data from the Suomi NPP satellite, taken during December 2011-January 2012, when vegetation is naturally less prevalent.
Satellite remote sensing instrumentation: learn it motherfuckers.
Seasons too.

lazaruswerks:

mindofsams:

jellybeanjeunet:

sleezysays:

NASA recently released imagery showing the deforestation of America  …in just 34 years.

We are killing the Earth

Forever reblog.

And people wonder why the Earth is trying to kill us off with the special shampoo

Except the “1978” image is actually data from the TERRA satellite in 1999 taken during June-August, when vegetation is naturally more prevalent. 

The 2012 image is data from the Suomi NPP satellite, taken during December 2011-January 2012, when vegetation is naturally less prevalent.

Satellite remote sensing instrumentation: learn it motherfuckers.

Seasons too.

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(Source: )

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cuteosphere:

I found this in a sketchbook under my bed ha ha

cuteosphere:

I found this in a sketchbook under my bed ha ha

Photoset

(Source: , via dragon-ebooks)

Tags: nebula space
Text

Space is awesome

lazaruswerks:

Did I mention how awesome space is?

Tags: space
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merlin:

Chris Glass » Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics


  A favorite part of Moscow was the Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics, which sits under the towering (and beautiful) Monument to the Conquerors of Space (a 360 feet tall titanium rocket shooting into space.)
  
  The museum is filled with artifcats, models, space suits, and ships from the Russian space program through the ages.


All of the photos from Chris’ trip to the former Soviet Union have (unsurprisingly) been great, but this amazing set’s my favorite.

Wow. What an eye that fella has.

merlin:

Chris Glass » Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics

A favorite part of Moscow was the Memorial Museum of Cosmonautics, which sits under the towering (and beautiful) Monument to the Conquerors of Space (a 360 feet tall titanium rocket shooting into space.)

The museum is filled with artifcats, models, space suits, and ships from the Russian space program through the ages.

All of the photos from Chris’ trip to the former Soviet Union have (unsurprisingly) been great, but this amazing set’s my favorite.

Wow. What an eye that fella has.

Tags: Space
Photoset

bitcy:

adriofthedead:

surfdog2000:

jtotheizzoe:

smithsonianmag:

Never-Before-Seen Photos From the Early Days of Space Exploration

The Gemini astronauts also took some of the most memorable photos in NASA history. You’d think we would have seen them all by now. But with Nasa’s help and funding, a team of researchers at Arizona State University led by lunar scientist Mark Robinson has retrieved from the archives dozens of outtakes that never made it into wide circulation.

Photos: NASA

Ed note: Check out our friends at Air & Space for more stunning photos from the Gemini mission.

These are an absolute treasure. I don’t know if it was the tight quarters, lack of illumination, or the particular light characteristics of the Hasselblad 70mm cameras used on these missions, but they are equal parts spooky and beautiful. They capture the sort of terrifying, dramatic excitement that I imagine being one of the first men in orbit felt like. 

A little extra tidbit about spacewalk photos from this era: Those gas canisters you see in their hands as they exit the spacecraft? Those are called “zip guns”, and they were used to maneuver while outside the capsule. Sort of like when Wall-e rides the fire extinguisher through space.

just a little reminder that this happened, and it was incredible

space is cool

SPAAAAAAAAAACE

Tags: SPACE
Photoset

lazaruswerks:

#penny4NASA

Right now there’s a movement beginning to form.

A lot of us love our space history.

Project Mercury proved that a man could go to, operate within and return safely from space.

Project Gemini showed us that we could build vehicles that could carry two astronauts and keep them alive in space for a couple of weeks at a time.

Project Apollo was the icing on the cake: We set a goal for ourselves and we accomplished it: Astronauts walked on the Moon.

The Space Shuttles gave us the means to conduct scientific experiments and build our current project: the International Space Station.

And let’s not forget the countless robotic programs: Mariner, Voyager, Galileo, Cassini, the Mars Exploration Rovers and the past, present and future missions to come.

But something’s amiss: NASA ain’t what it used to be.

During the height of glory, NASA received a solid 4% of the US Government’s annual budget.

Today, NASA will receive 0.45% of the proposed FY2013 budget. Less than half a penny for every dollar of taxes you pays goes to pushing humanity beyond it’s boundaries.

Most are shocked to learn that NASA receives such a small amount of the money is takes to run this country, with most figures during public polls placing our budget near “20-40%”, and they couldn’t be further from the truth.

Congress seems to be set on space history, and in doing so, is cutting NASA’s budget significantly, attempting to make traveling to space…history.

Some of us are NOT okay with this, and we are beginning to let our voices be heard.

NASA is not simply just an exploratory agency, the technological benifits that have been dervied from the work NASA has done have revolutionized our cultures and economies.

Personal computers, GPS, smart phones, water purification systems, vaccines against diseases, lighter materials, maybe even the mattress you sleep on every night: none of it would be possible without the help of NASA.

All we’re asking for is a slight increase in the budget to NASA: move from 0.45% to 1%. Let’s dedicate a single penny of every tax-dollar received to NASA.

Sign this petition today advocating this increase and let your voice be heard.

Imagine what we could do with a single penny.

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lazaruswerks:

Discovery, the most veteran of the surviving Space Shuttles, prepares to be flown for the final time to its new home at the Smithsonian Air and Space museum.

lazaruswerks:

Discovery, the most veteran of the surviving Space Shuttles, prepares to be flown for the final time to its new home at the Smithsonian Air and Space museum.

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lazaruswerks:

Detail on the side of the 747 Shuttle Carrier plane.
Photo: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

lazaruswerks:

Detail on the side of the 747 Shuttle Carrier plane.

Photo: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

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lazaruswerks:

“Поехали!”
Today is the 51st Anniversary of the flight of Vostok 1, when Yuri Gagarin became the first person form this planet to climb above 100km and into the void.
A little over 8 years after, we were 240,000 miles away and walking on the surface of the closest celestial object to us.
You’d have figured that by 2000 we’d have had a colony on Mars.
But here we are in 2012, and we’re still flying overhead, just at 240 miles, one-thousandth the distance to the Moon.
What happened?
Where did we go wrong?
Where along the timeline did we let ourselves fall back to the Earth?
I’m not sure these questions have valid answers, and I most certainly lack the understanding to correctly approach them, but it is worth noting that we’re behind where we should be.
How long will it take us to restore ourselves to our spaceflight glory, something unseen since the late 60’s into the early 70’s?
I’m not sure that question has a valid answer either, but I’m happy to be a part of the equation, ever looking forward, planning, hopeful to be one of those who push us even further than before.
Like Yuri.

lazaruswerks:

“Поехали!”

Today is the 51st Anniversary of the flight of Vostok 1, when Yuri Gagarin became the first person form this planet to climb above 100km and into the void.

A little over 8 years after, we were 240,000 miles away and walking on the surface of the closest celestial object to us.

You’d have figured that by 2000 we’d have had a colony on Mars.

But here we are in 2012, and we’re still flying overhead, just at 240 miles, one-thousandth the distance to the Moon.

What happened?

Where did we go wrong?

Where along the timeline did we let ourselves fall back to the Earth?

I’m not sure these questions have valid answers, and I most certainly lack the understanding to correctly approach them, but it is worth noting that we’re behind where we should be.

How long will it take us to restore ourselves to our spaceflight glory, something unseen since the late 60’s into the early 70’s?

I’m not sure that question has a valid answer either, but I’m happy to be a part of the equation, ever looking forward, planning, hopeful to be one of those who push us even further than before.

Like Yuri.

Photo
kqedscience:

The International Space Station’s humanoid robot helper, Robonaut 2, reaches out to touch a gloved astronaut hand in a photo that pays tribute to Michelangelo’s Sistine ceiling painting.
CREDIT: NASA 

kqedscience:

The International Space Station’s humanoid robot helper, Robonaut 2, reaches out to touch a gloved astronaut hand in a photo that pays tribute to Michelangelo’s Sistine ceiling painting.


CREDIT: NASA 

(via bitcy)

Tags: space NASA ISS