Photo
laughingsquid:

Anti-Loneliness Ramen Bowl iPhone Dock
Tags: tech iphone ramen
Link

parislemon:

Thus continuing the trend of people loving the “dogfood” when they’re inside a company, and throwing it up when they’re out.

Most of the ones I notice (both with people I know and those in public) are former Microsoft employees. People leave and immediately switch to Macs, iPhones, iPads, Google Docs, Chrome, Android devices, etc.

What I never see is people leaving Apple and switching to other products — PCs, Android devices, Windows Phone, etc. I’m sure there are some out there, but for the most part ex-Apple employees seem to remain “loyal” to the brand. Read into that what you will.

Photo
parislemon:

nevver:

“No chance the iPhone is going to get any significant market share.” — Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, 2007

Reblog-bait.

parislemon:

nevver:

“No chance the iPhone is going to get any significant market share.” — Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, 2007

Reblog-bait.

Link

parislemon:

Kevin Fitchard of GigaOm:

T-Mobile will shift entirely to its unsubsidized Value Plans, which offer customers far cheaper rates for voice and particular data. Traditionally carriers factor subsidies into their normal contracts rates – basically you’re paying a mortgage on your phone. With the Value program, T-Mobile is keeping the contract, but passing what it saves on subsidies back to consumer.

I, for one, really really really hopes this works. But my guess is that it won’t. Customers absolutely should be fine with paying more upfront in order to save a ton in the long run, but it never works that way. Instant gratification, and all that.

The finance part of the equation is certainly a wild-card, but that sounds awfully convoluted. My only hope is that it’s only slightly more convoluted than a two-year carrier contract. Also, that T-Mobile can get its head out of its ass and launches an LTE network sometime this decade.

LTE would be nice, but 3G would be better. Were I to bring my own phone over to their network right now, I’d only get EDGE at best, which while adequate for text, is a bit on the slow side.

Photo
inspiredbyapple:

Shavetech: I don’t really want to spoil it for you, so go check it out yourselves. It’s “the newest standard in shaving”, apparently, although presumably a proprietary closed standard, and incompatible with your existing charging cables. If only Victor Kiam were still alive to see this.
(via Gizmodo)

Or, you know, maybe one of these that doesn’t require electricity and actually gives a good, close shave:

inspiredbyapple:

Shavetech: I don’t really want to spoil it for you, so go check it out yourselves. It’s “the newest standard in shaving”, apparently, although presumably a proprietary closed standard, and incompatible with your existing charging cables. If only Victor Kiam were still alive to see this.

(via Gizmodo)

Or, you know, maybe one of these that doesn’t require electricity and actually gives a good, close shave:

Photo
\o/

\o/

Link

parislemon:

Marco Arment, reacting to Andy Ihnatko’s thoughts that the consumers lose as a result of Apple’s win over Samsung:

What’s really going to disrupt the iPhone is going to be something completely different, not something that tries so hard to clone the iPhone that it hits Apple’s patents.

Unoriginal manufacturers will need to pay for their unoriginality. The most reasonable course of action, therefore, is to truly innovate and design products that aren’t such close copies.

I fail to see how consumers lose.

I completely agree that what will end the iPhone’s run is something totally different, not a copycat. Maybe Apple will make that product, or maybe someone else will. This case does nothing to stop that. It simply stops people from copying the current iPhone.

What does worry me about this lawsuit is that it’s going to lead to many more. And it makes patents even more important, and as such, more valuable. That could end up hurting many companies, both large and small. And it could distract from innovation because everyone will be so preoccupied with filing patents, looking for ones that they might be infringing upon, or in court.

Link

parislemon:

This has been the top story on Techmeme the entire day — complete with what may well be the worst headline ever to grace Techmeme: “What’s up dock? Apple to shrink connector for iPhone 5”

The pun is bad. The inability to count is worse.

John Gruber tried to talk some people off the ledge earlier:

Regarding the article: Apple is already abandoning its own only-a-decade-old proprietary adaptor for something better and smaller; PC notebooks still ship with huge 25-year-old VGA ports. Every time I bring this up, the VGA defenders argue that of course notebooks need to ship with VGA ports, added thickness be damned, because the world is full of VGA-only projectors. But the world is also full of Apple 30-pin dock connector cables and accessories. This is how progress is made.

Finally, Rene Ritchie comes through:

While this seems like this should go without saying, because of all the questions we’ve been getting, and posts we’ve been seeing, iMore reached out to the original sources that gave us the new Dock connector story way back in February just to make doubly sure — and yes, there will be an adapter for the iPhone 5’s smaller Dock connector that will let it work with many of the accessories designed for the old 30-pin Dock connector.

Thank god. Major international crisis averted. Just imagine if Apple had forgotten!

Photo
parislemon:

Louie Mantia has schooled some tech journalists in an important subject: counting.
(via Marco Arment)

parislemon:

Louie Mantia has schooled some tech journalists in an important subject: counting.

(via Marco Arment)

Video

parislemon:

Hmmmm.

(via John Gruber)

If that’s the next iPhone, I’m not sure I like the design …

Link

parislemon:

Newsflash: device subsidies aren’t actually a great deal for consumers. The big carriers trick you up front to get you in the rear.

Link

parislemon:

Matthew Lynn, January 14, 2007:

To its many fans, Apple is more of a religious cult than a company. An iToaster that downloads music while toasting bread would probably get the same kind of worldwide attention.

And:

Don’t let that fool you into thinking that it matters. The big competitors in the mobile-phone industry such as Nokia Oyj and Motorola Inc. won’t be whispering nervously into their clamshells over a new threat to their business.

And:

First, Apple is late to this party. The company didn’t invent the personal computer or MP3 player, but it was among the pioneers of both products. Yet there is no shortage of phones out there. There are already big companies that dominate the space, all of whom will defend their turf. That means Apple will have to fight hard for every sale.

And:

Yet Apple has never been good at working with other companies. If it knew how to do that, it would be Microsoft Corp.

And:

Lastly, the iPhone is a defensive product. It is mainly designed to protect the iPod, which is coming under attack from mobile manufacturers adding music players to their handsets.

And:

It won’t come from the iPhone. Apple will sell a few to its fans, but the iPhone won’t make a long-term mark on the industry.

Nailed it.

I mean…

I’m absolutely flabbergasted. Where to begin? The fucking Nokia Oyj?!

Hindsight is 20/20 and all that. But come on. What a huge jackass. If he had said the exact opposite of everything he said, he would have been much closer to the truth than he was.

[thanks Tobin]

Link

parislemon:

When I posted my Instagram comparison shots earlier, people bitched that it wasn’t the same scene, so it wasn’t a fair comparison.

Fair enough.

John Gruber took the *exact* same shot with an iPhone 4S and a Galaxy Nexus — using the same filter. The results once again speak for themselves.

While it looks like the Galaxy Nexus has shit on the lens. The reality is that it’s just a shittier lens.

Photoset

parislemon:

First image I saw in my stream from Instagram for Android (Galaxy Nexus) versus the last Instagram I took (iPhone 4S). 

Any questions?

Seriously, the Instagram team did a great job porting the world’s best photo app — 30 million users! — and, as a free app, Android is going to be massive for them. They’re going to hit 50 million in no time. But there’s one thing they have no control over: camera quality. Looking at my stream, it’s very obvious which pictures were taken with the iPhone and which were taken with Android devices. iPad 2 versus Android is harder to distinguish. 

(Sorry Charles :) )

Link

parislemon:

I’ve been testing out Tweetbot for iPad for a few weeks now, it’s brilliant. Well worth the $2.99 price. If you’re in any way a Twitter power user, this is the client to get.

And I say that as a huge fan of Twitter’s official client for iPad. My concern is that, like the iPhone version, it will soon be “upgraded” — which, in many of our eyes, has unfortunately meant “made worse”.

On that topic, Tweetbot has unleashed a one-two punch today and also unveiled Tweetbot 2.0 for iPhone (also $2.99 as a separate app from the iPad version, but the upgrade from version 1 is free). I’ve also had the chance to try that out for a few weeks, and it’s my go-to Twitter client on the device now. It’s in my dock.

For full reviews of both, be sure to check out Federico Viticci’s takes on Macstories. Here’s his review of Tweetbot 2.0 for iPhone. And his review of Tweetbot for iPad.